June is here and so’s about to be summer.  While it's still toasty and sunny enough outdoors, grab your favorite quilt, frisbee, kite, snack treats, and one or perhaps all of these albums that released on June 1st. Get your happy-go-lucky booty to the park before the notoriously cloudy and nipply SF summer weather returns.  Even when the hair-raising brisk temps invade, keep the likes of these albums on your summer music repertoire, including Joan of Arc, Father John Misty, Neko Case, Natalie Prass, and Black Thought.

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Joan of Arc

Like the title of the album suggests, there is a vigorous dystopian mood present in this collection.  The sound offers a tug-of-war feel, in its softer vocals and elegant instrumentation that break into rock jams, inspired by the later records of Black Flag.

Below is "Punk Kid"

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Black Thought 

He's the leading MC of The Roots and has collaborated with a multitude of folks in the hip hop industry over the past three decades. This is a debut EP that echoes the fundamentals of refreshing old school hip hop beats and dominates lyrical rap.

Below is “Dostoyevsky” feat. Rapsody

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Natalie Prass

This is the second album for Prass, and has peppy dashes of funk with mellow, poised vocals and cunning lyrics.  This is perfect for getting lost in and swaying to if you're looking for ambient sound with a kick.

Below is "Lost"

  

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Father John Misty

This album is noted for its more outward rather than internal philosophical delving on never-ending world + self pondering that Father John Misty is know for.  Musically, the sound matches the tone, light-hearted, breezy and hits the indie folk spot.

Below is "Please Don't Die"

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Neko Case

Case's 7th album is an impassioned story in its entirety about the cruelty of people (men in particular), and navigating through pain and fury.  The music is of course incendiary, as Case's voice and lyrics deliver honey-toned, yet abrasive truths in variations of indie folk-country and bits of glam.

Below is a Live performance of "Gumball Blue"